Fall Trail work has begun. We meet Sunday's 8:00am at Drillen Hardware on Sabattus Street. Hope to see you there.


Next meeting will be October 6th 2014. 7:00pm at the Ramada Inn.

Snowmobile Safety:

**These are just guidelines for safety therefore we assume no responsibility in the event of an accident**

- Riding tips from the Maine Snowmobile Association -

Ride Right In Maine


JUDGING ICE CONDITIONS

"Thick and blue, tried and true. Thin and crispy, way to risky."

The ice traveler should look for bluish ice that is at least 4 to 6 inches thick, in order to support people and their gear. Even if the weather has been below freezing for several days, don't guess about ice thickness. Check ice in several places. Use an auger, spud, or axe to make a test hole, beginning at shore and continuing as you go out.If ice at the shoreline is cracked or squishy, stay off. Don't go on the ice during thaws. Watch out for thin, clear or honeycomb-shaped ice. Dark snow and dark ice are other signs of weak spots.Choose small bodies of water. Rivers and lakes are prone to wind and wave action, which can break ice up quickly. Avoid areas with currents, around bridges and pressure ridges.In the wintertime, outdoor enthusiasts frequently need to know how thick the ice is and whether it is safe to walk across it. The American Pulpwood Association has published a hand reference chart that gives a good rule-of-thumb for ponds and lake ice thickness.

"Wait for a long cold spell, then test the ice thoroughly."

What if I break through the ice??

If you break through the ice, don't panic. Don't try to climb out - you'll probably break the ice again. Lay both arms on the unbroken ice and kick hard. This will help lift your body onto the ice. Roll to safety.

To help someone who has fallen in, lie down flat and reach with a branch, plank, or rope; or form a human chain. Don't stand. After securing the victim, wiggle backwards to the solid ice. The victim may need treatment for hypothermia (cold exposure), artificial respiration or CPR.

Snowmobile trails are cut, groomed, signed and maintained by volunteers. Are you doing your part? Join a Club - Support your sport!